Anyone for a nutritional powerhouse ice lolly?

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Don’t they look tasty? These frozen kale smoothies on a stick have been highlighted as a key food trend by a panel of experts at this year’s Summer Fancy Food Show in New York. Kalelicious Smoothie Pops are the brainchild of Green Wave Smoothies and aim to provide a delicious and nutritious way to get your greens. These smoothie pops are made by a mum and daughter who were looking for healthy snack and dessert alternatives, so decided to make their own. They’re currently only available in the US, but could be making their way to the UK in the not-too-distant future if they are as popular as predicted. Fingers crossed…

Is your dairy intolerance self-diagnosed?

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If you answered yes to the above, you could be at risk of nutritional deficiency, warns Allergy UK.

New research from Alpro has revealed 44% of people that class themselves as dairy intolerant are relying on the internet and general guess work to self-diagnose. 72% of those suffering from dairy intolerance symptoms have removed all sources of dairy from their diet, the main source of calcium in the UK. A further 25% have cut out some dairy food groups. Gut problems including stomach pain, bloating and diarrhoea were cited as the most common reasons for cutting out dairy: eczema and nasal/sinus congestion were listed fourth and fifth.

Calcium is essential for the development and maintenance of healthy bones and teeth; it also regulates muscle contractions including the heartbeat. Calcium is particularly vital for women as low levels can increase your risk of osteoporosis. It’s found in foods including milk, cheese, butter, yoghurt, green leafy vegetables such as kale, broccoli and cabbage, dried fruits such as apricots, tofu and sesame seeds.  

Over half of the people surveyed felt there was not enough advice out there for dairy intolerance sufferers. They would like to see more information on calcium, recipes, suitable dairy swaps and ideas for eating out. A huge 75% said they would prefer to be diagnosed by a face-to-face consultation.

If you are concerned you may have symptoms that indicate dairy intolerance, Allergy UK advises: “to help identify whether a food is a cause of symptoms, a food/symptoms diary can help to identify a pattern. We would always recommend taking the diary to your GP or allergy specialist who can diagnose what may be causing the symptoms or refer you to a dietitian.”

Whether you are dairy intolerant or a dairy lover, make sure you maintain a good calcium intake in your diet…

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos

Get heart healthy (and watch the salt)

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As it’s National Heart Month and I seem to be writing an awful lot about salt at the moment, I thought it was high time I whipped up a timely blog post on the topic.

Every day, 26 million of us are eating too much salt and as 75% of the salt we eat is already added to a variety of manufactured foods: we may be eating more than we realise.

The top salty food culprits are: cheese, certain breakfast cereals, processed meat (ham, bacon), stock cubes, sauces, gravy granules, bread, bread products, salted nuts and potato-based snacks.

A diet high in salt can cause high blood pressure (hypertension), which often has no symptoms. Hypertension affects one in three adults in the UK. If you have high blood pressure, this can increase the risk of stroke and heart problems developing.

Making small changes can help to lower blood pressure. Instead of adding salt when preparing meals, add flavour to food using herbs, spices, wine, vinegar, garlic, onion, lemon and lime juice. Reducing the number of processed foods and ready meals you eat will also help.

Image courtesy of Free Digital Photos

Natural wrinkle wonder: watercress

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If you thought watercress was simply an accompaniment to liven up an egg mayonnaise sandwich or to add some colour to your plate, think again. New research suggests watercress can not only improve your skin health, leading to fewer blemishes and less visible pores, it can also reduce the spread of wrinkles.

The Watercress Alliance asked a group of female volunteers to eat 80g of watercress every day for four weeks and make no other changes to their diet. The women had their faces photographed before and after using a special complexion-analysing system. 

90% experienced a difference in their skin and over 70% reported a change in the texture of their skin and a remarkable improvement in their wrinkles. Half of the women experienced reduced red and blotchy areas and 81% noticed their pores had become less noticeable.

Watercress is packed with antioxidants such as vitamins C, A and E, lutein, carotene, calcium and iron.

What’s more, watercress is currently in season and is readily available – hooray!

 

Image courtesy of Think Vegetables

Do you know where fruit and vegetables come from?

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If this question has you shrieking ‘of course I bloody do’, you may be surprised to read new research carried out by the Potato Council has revealed many of us have little to no idea.

2,000 adults were questioned as part of the research to celebrate the launch of a new potato classification system. The research revealed:

* Three out of ten adults cannot explain how potatoes are produced

* One in ten thinks tomatoes are harvested from the ground

* One in five believes melons grow on the earth and that parsnips thrive on trees

* One in 20 think a Granny Smith is a variety of potato

* 20% of the 2,000 adults surveyed had never heard of a King Edward or a Maris Piper

One in 20 adults also confessed to feeling embarrassed about their lack of knowledge, with a quarter admitting they regularly have no idea what to say when children ask where food comes from.

Caroline Evans from the Potato Council says: “Our research shows that some British adults need to brush up on their foodie knowledge.”

Quite…

Image courtesy of Free Digital Photos

Five reasons why we should eat more Marmite

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Apparently we all either love or hate Marmite. I don’t actually love or hate it, I’m very much in the ‘it’s okay but I don’t eat it very often’ camp.

My GP recommended I eat more Marmite to try and increase my iron levels, I’m prone to anaemia you see. This provided a catalyst for this post as I wondered what else Marmite can help with and as it is vegetarian-friendly too, it could be a good health boost for many of us. Here’s why…

1. Boosts brain power – as it’s rich in vitamin B12 and folic acid, Marmite can help to improve memory and focus.

2. Tackles anaemia – Marmite is not only a rich source of iron, it also contains iodine which helps our bodies to absorb iron.

3. Can help combat depression – a lack of B vitamins can lead to anxiety and depression. Marmite is loaded with B vitamins and could help to improve low mood.

4. Great hangover fix – we feel so rough after a night on the sauce as a result of our bodies lacking essential nutrients such as B vitamins. Marmite’s sodium content can also help to replenish lost salts.

5. Makes skin glow – vitamin B1, more commonly known as thiamin, helps our bodies to get the most out of the energy and nutrients in our food. This in turn helps our skin to look good. Marmite also contains riboflavin (vitamin B2) which is essential for healthy hair, skin and nails.

I’m making a pact to increase my weekly (currently non-existent) quota of Marmite, who’s with me?!

 

Image courtesy of Press Loft/Prezzybox.

Five ways to tackle your energy slumps

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2.16pm is the most common time for us to experience energy slumps according to research – at this time we are most likely to feel drained and unable to concentrate.

Find out how to beat your energy slumps.

1. Eat more protein – this provides our bodies with long-lasting energy and avoids blood sugar drops that can negatively affect our alertness. Tuck into: oatcakes, wholegrains, lean meat, low-fat dairy options and nuts at lunchtime.

2. Have a mid-afternoon snack – beware that energy boosts from sugar snacks wear off quickly. Opt for fresh fruit, dried fruit or nuts instead as these are a longer-lasting source of energy. If you’re desperate for a chocolate fix – have a couple of squares of good-for-you dark chocolate. I also recently tried a new juice-based organic energy drink, Scheckter’s Organic Energy Lite. It’s made from all natural and organic ingredients and was a perfect pick-me-up from a big energy slump after an early start.

3. Don’t skip meals – having long gaps between meals can cause blood sugar levels to drop – try and eat something every 2-3 hours.

4. Drink water – keep a filled bottle of water on your desk so you’re more likely to have a drink regularly. Water can help you to feel less sleepy and also boosts concentration.

5. Get outside at lunchtime – the fresh air will perk you up and help to improve your concentration when you return to work.

Predictable lunch, anyone?

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When it comes to lunch us Brits can be pretty unadventurous and stuck in our foodie ways. In a recent poll by Whole Foods Market, one in three people admitted to eating the same food for lunch, every day.

The delectable and dependable cheese sandwich was named the most popular option, followed by the equally easy-peasy-to-prepare ham sandwich.

Half of the 2000 people surveyed, confessed to eating the same lunch option every day, with many confessing they had been munching on the same lunchtime fodder for over SIX years. Four out of ten said they stick to the same food because it’s easy and one in ten simply because it’s cheap.  A frank seven out of ten of those people were also quite happy to admit their lunches are dull.

If you’re perfectly happy with your predictable lunches, you’re not alone. But, if you are stuck in a routine and crave a little lunchtime variety, take a look at Love Sarnies, a site dedicated to celebrating 250 years of sandwiches. On there you will find a wealth of mouth-watering ideas for vegetarian, vegan and meat-eating tastebuds.

Lunch need never be dull again, unless you would prefer to keep it that way, of course.

Can we boost our grey matter with the white stuff?

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I’ve had mine today, have you had yours? Yes, we all know milk is a great source of calcium which helps build and maintain healthy bones, as well as giving our bodies a vitamin and protein boost. But did you know, a glass of milk a day could also boost your brain power too?

New US research certainly seems to think so. Milk drinkers, irrespective of age and health, performed significantly higher on a range of brain and cognitive tests than those who drank little or no milk in the study of 972 men and women.

Each participant was asked to keep a detailed record on their diets and how often they consumed dairy products, even including milk added to tea and coffee. The research, published in the International Dairy Journal, showed adults who consumed dairy products five or six times per week performed better in a series of tests to check memory, concentration and learning ability.

Interestingly, the study also found those who regularly drink milk also tend to maintain a healthy diet, compared to non-milk drinkers.

So, will this new research make you more likely to reach for a milky drink before tackling a looming work deadline? I’d love to know…

 

Image courtesy of Press Loft/Dotcomgiftshop

Get healthy: The eat well factor

 

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As part of her role as a mentor on The X Factor, Kelly Rowland brings with her a huge breadth of experience in the music industry and knows all too well that success is not all down to vocal talent, looking good is also key. The superfit star, who leads a focused healthy lifestyle, wants to help her acts look and feel their best by giving advice on nutrition and introducing a strict diet and exercise plan.

By the time the live shows roll around next month, the star wants her acts to be in the best possible shape, mentally and physically, and to help this happen, all fast food is banned. Kelly will be keeping a close eye on them to ensure no naughty snacking takes place.

For advice on how to get your food balance right, the Eatwell Plate is a great at-a-glance guide that shows how much of what you eat should come from each food group. It is suitable for most people – whether healthy, overweight, meat eaters or vegetarian, regardless of ethnic origin. It does not apply, however, to young children as they have different nutritional needs.

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The British Dietetic Association, have very kindly offered Ms Rowland the services of a dietitian to help advise her acts on healthy eating that will give them the nutrition and energy they need to make it through the live shows.

For the rest of us, here is some very helpful advice from Sian Burton, spokesperson for the BDA: “Eating a variety of foods can help you manage your weight, improve general wellbeing and reduce the risk of conditions including: heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes and osteoporosis. All you need to do is eat sensibly, choose a range of foods in the correct proportions and have a variety of foods and fluids.”