Are you a ditherer or a doer?

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We’re all guilty of procrastinating from time to time – whether it’s due to can’t-be-botheredness or any number of silly distractions that win the battle for our attention when they REALLY could wait.

Other times, the reason for our procrastination can be an underlying problem such as fear of failure – or even fear of success. Procrastination can fill our bodies with anxiety hormones and lead to heightened stress and poor sleep long-term. So, is it better to be a doer?

New research has introduced the idea of pre-crastination. Pre-crastinators are amazing types that hate to delay deadlines and instead hurry to get them done and dusted as soon as possible. They like to chalk tricky tasks off their to-do list to offload the task from their minds. Even if it takes a lot more effort to do so.

“Most of us feel stressed about all the things we need to do, we have to-do lists, not just on slips of paper we carry with us or on our phones, but also in our heads,” said David Rosenbaum, a psychological scientist at Pennsylvania State University, who carried out the research. “Our findings suggest that the desire to relieve the stress of maintaining that information in the working memory can cause us to over-exert ourselves physically or take extra risks.”

Whether you’re a putting it off or a must do now kind of person, you can still be prone to stress-related symptoms.

Me? I’m going to start work on developing my pre-crastinator instincts pronto…

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos

 

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Why do we find chips so irresistible?

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This time last week, I was sat on a local beach blissfully warm and loving the weather. I was pondering whether to get an ice cream, until I caught a whiff of the food of a stranger walking by. While the man in question was eagerly eyeing up his heavenly-smelling chip shop stash, I looked on with envy.

Before I knew it I had hot-footed it to the counter and was lovingly coating my freshly-cooked chips in oodles of vinegar. Thoughts of having an ice cream had vanished. As enjoyable as those lovely chips were, why were they suddenly so irresistible? Did the sea air make them seem all that more delectable?

Well…the overwhelming reason is because chips trigger cravings in the brain, according to new research. US researchers found foods with processed carbohydrates such as chips and white bread, trigger heightened levels of activity in the areas of our brain that are associated with rewards and cravings. Aha, that’s why.

Researchers at the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Centre at Boston Children’s Hospital believe the findings of the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, could now be used to help overweight people stop overeating by avoiding those sorts of foods.

How do you keep your processed carbs cravings in check? For me, chip shop chips are a very occasional treat. I think they taste better that way too…

Brighten up on Blue Monday

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If you want to avoid feeling too down in the dumps on Blue Monday (Monday 21st January), wear bright clothes, Mental Health Research UK advises.

January as a whole can be a month when many of us feel pretty miserable, yet researchers claim that the third Monday of January is the most depressing day of the year. This is due to bad weather, reduced daylight, debt, the need for Christmas detox and poor motivation.

MHRUK hopes to brighten up Britain with its campaign, Blooming Monday. The charity aims to raise awareness of depression and seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and hopes to encourage people participating in brightening up their attire for the day to donate £2 to MHRUK to fund research into treatments.

If you’re wearing bright colours on Monday and want to make a voluntary difference, you can donate £2 to MHRUK by texting BLOO22 to 70070.

Image courtesy of Free Digital Photos

Keep your eyes on the healthy food supplies…

 

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To keep your diet or healthy eating plan on the right track, the advice from psychologists is simple: putting healthy foods at eye level in the fridge can help you to lose weight (or stay trim) as you eat what you first see.

When faced with junk food temptation in the fridge and in our cupboards, experts say we often absentmindedly eat what is in front of us whether we are hungry or not.  

If your fridge currently resembles a tuck shop, and your cupboards are heaving with crisps and biscuits, putting snacks and sweet treats out of sight, so they are less accessible, can make a big difference, say psychologists. Changing the environment around you and ensuring you see only wholesome healthy food alternatives can help you to eat better without even realising it.

Becoming more aware of what you are eating by opting to use smaller plates and consuming meals at the table, away from TV distractions, can also help you to subconsciously eat less, and lose up to 2lb per month, studies have shown.

It makes perfect sense to me. If I look in the fridge and staring right back at me is a slice of cheesecake, I’d need some serious unswerving willpower not to dive in, whether hungry or not. If, when I next opened the fridge, a tray of blueberries were at my eye level instead, I’d still be happy to munch away, except this time I would have made a far healthier choice without thinking about it all that much.

So, just a load of twaddle or very useful advice for keeping you on the healthy track? Over to you…