Eight tips to improve work-related back pain

If, like me, you are becoming increasingly wary of what working long hours each day is doing to the health and wellbeing of your back, these tips from the British Chiropractic Association will help to relieve the aches, pains and potential long-term damage our poor posture and bad habits are causing. 

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1. Relax when sitting into your chair, making sure your bum is against the back of the seat with your shoulder blades touching the back rest of your chair.

2. Make sure your feet touch the floor, or use a foot rest.

3. Remove any obstacles from under your desk to ensure you have enough leg room.

4. There should be space between the front of your seat and the back of your calves.

5. Your hips should be higher than your knees. Tilt your seat, if needed.

6. Arms should be flat and your elbows level with the desk or table you are using. The BCA also advises using a chair with arm rests.

7. Take regular breaks. Never sit at the computer for more than 40 minutes, aim for less if possible.

8. When you take a break, walk around and stretch a little, do something completely different.

 

 

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Get healthy: The eat well factor

 

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As part of her role as a mentor on The X Factor, Kelly Rowland brings with her a huge breadth of experience in the music industry and knows all too well that success is not all down to vocal talent, looking good is also key. The superfit star, who leads a focused healthy lifestyle, wants to help her acts look and feel their best by giving advice on nutrition and introducing a strict diet and exercise plan.

By the time the live shows roll around next month, the star wants her acts to be in the best possible shape, mentally and physically, and to help this happen, all fast food is banned. Kelly will be keeping a close eye on them to ensure no naughty snacking takes place.

For advice on how to get your food balance right, the Eatwell Plate is a great at-a-glance guide that shows how much of what you eat should come from each food group. It is suitable for most people – whether healthy, overweight, meat eaters or vegetarian, regardless of ethnic origin. It does not apply, however, to young children as they have different nutritional needs.

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The British Dietetic Association, have very kindly offered Ms Rowland the services of a dietitian to help advise her acts on healthy eating that will give them the nutrition and energy they need to make it through the live shows.

For the rest of us, here is some very helpful advice from Sian Burton, spokesperson for the BDA: “Eating a variety of foods can help you manage your weight, improve general wellbeing and reduce the risk of conditions including: heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes and osteoporosis. All you need to do is eat sensibly, choose a range of foods in the correct proportions and have a variety of foods and fluids.”