Why are men reluctant to talk health?

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As most of my blog content is aimed at women, I thought I’d switch to a male-focused post for today after reading some alarming research by insureblue which supports the Blue Ribbon Foundation to raise awareness of male health issues.

1,000 men aged 18 and over were asked about their views on health and their attitude to seeing healthcare professionals for basic health checks such as blood pressure, measuring weight and cholesterol levels.

The respondents’ reluctant attitude to their health was unveiled in all its glory as:

One in five men admitted they have not seen their doctor in the last three years – 2% confessed they have never seen their GP.

Two-thirds of men surveyed have family history of cancer, stroke and heart disease – yet more than half have not had basic healthcare checks in the last year.

Most worrying reading was centred on what conditions the men surveyed WOULD consult their doctor over. Only 65% said yes if they were experiencing chest pain. Men were not so concerned with breathlessness and blurred vision with only half of respondents admitting they would see their GP if those conditions arose. 

The top condition men would definitely go and see their doctor about (82% confirmed this) was finding blood in urine/semen which is most reassuring to read as this can sometimes be a symptom of prostate cancer.

Surely any unusual symptoms are worth checking out with your doctor? Experts feel it is embarrassment which prevents men going to see their GP – but isn’t peace of mind worth the discomfort factor?

I’d love to hear male viewpoints on this – do you get the jitters at the thought of seeing your doctor? Why is this? And for those men reading who are cool with seeing their doctor and enjoy being health aware, please also share your thoughts too. The more male health chatter the better!

Let’s talk body image – Body Gossip campaign

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In today’s post I wanted to highlight the fantastic campaign Body Gossip which hopes to raise awareness of the body image issues affecting today’s society and promote the message of self-acceptance.

One of the celebrities getting behind the campaign is Big Brother starlet and model Nikki Grahame whose lifelong battle with anorexia was the subject of her excellent book Dying To Be Thin, which Nikki wrote to help raise awareness of anorexia and to give hope to sufferers of the illness that leading a happy and healthy life is possible.

The campaign provides a platform for the public and celebrities to unite and speak out about the body issues affecting us, and hopes to discourage finger-pointing, as eating disorders can happen to anybody at anytime. The site contains some thought-provoking videos, expert advice, your views on body image and real-life stories including 31-year-old Amy’s story.

Delve in and join the debate…